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Bruckner, Mahler, Schoenberg Dika Newlin

Bruckner, Mahler, Schoenberg

Dika Newlin

Published January 1st 1920
ISBN : 9780393004212
Paperback
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 About the Book 

Text extracted from opening pages of book: Bruckner Mahler Schoenberg DIKA NEWLIN KINGS GROWN PRESS MORNINGSIDE HEIGHTS : NEW YORK COPYRIGHT 1947 BY DIKA NEWLIN Printed in the United States of America by Vail-Ballou Press, Inc. Kings Crown Press isMoreText extracted from opening pages of book: Bruckner Mahler Schoenberg DIKA NEWLIN KINGS GROWN PRESS MORNINGSIDE HEIGHTS : NEW YORK COPYRIGHT 1947 BY DIKA NEWLIN Printed in the United States of America by Vail-Ballou Press, Inc. Kings Crown Press is a division of Columbia University Press organized for the purpose of making certain scholarly material available at minimum cost. Toward that end,, the publishers have adopted every reasonable economy except such as would interfere with a legible format. hms First Printing: 1947 Second Printing: 1947 To my friends MARIAN PASCHAL and HENRIETTE VOORSANGER whose interest has made this work possible Acknowledgments Both author and publisher gratefully acknowledge the following per missions to use quotations, both of words and of music- without the amiable cooperation of those listed here, it would have been difficult indeed to have concluded this study. Associated Music Publishers, Inc., New York, for various quotations from works by Bruckner, Mahler and Schoenberg, Boosey and Hawkes, Inc., New York, for quotations from works by Mahler, reprinted by permission of the copyright owners, Boosey and Hawkes, Inc., New York- and also for the quotation from the Preface to Mahlers Das Lied von der Erde. Dodd, Mead and Co., New York, for quotation from Franz Grill parzer, by Gustav Pollak. E. P. Button and Co., Inc., New York, for quotations from Johannes Brahms, by Richard Specht, and from Arnold Schoenberg, by Egon Wellesz. The Greystone Press, New York, for quotation from Gustav Mahler, by Walter and Krenek, John W. Luce & Co., Boston, for quotation from Masks and Min strels of New Germany, by Percival Pollard. G. Schirmer, Inc., New York, for quotations from works by Beethoven and Bruckner, used by permission of the publisher, G. Schirmer, Inc. Arnold Schoenberg, for quotations from various works. Charles Scribners Sons, New York, for quotation from Ivory, Apes and Peacocks, by James Huneker. The Macmillan Company, New York, for quotation from Thus Spake Zarathustra, by Friedrich Nietzsche ( translated by Alexander me.)* Preface . HE IDEA of this book originally came to me during my years of study with Arnold Schoenberg in Los Angeles ( 1938-1941). At that time I was first introduced to the most radical works of Schoenberg works virtually unknown in this country so far as public performances are concerned. I felt the need of a historical background which would explain the origins of the new style. It was this which brought me to a study of the works of Mahler and Bruckner- for Schoenbergs oft expressed indebtedness to Mahler plainly indicated that the roots of Schoenbergs style might be found in Mahlers scores ( however different Mahlers music might be in texture from Schoenbergs), and the re lationship between Mahler and Bruckner seemed well established. Thence, it was but a step to the conclusion that Schoenberg is not only the heir of Bruckner and Mahler but also the heir of the great Viennese classical tradition, which they transmitted to him. It is this conclusion which I have tried to prove in the following pages- it has been my desire to portray Schoenbergs works as the culmination of several centuries of historical development, rather than as the products of a wilful icono clasm. To this end, I have attempted to place Schoenberg in the Vien nese cultural scene by analyzing, not only the musical background, but also the literary, artistic, and political background of his generation a task which I have likewise performed for the period of Bruckner and of Mahler. Such an extensive project could never have been carried out without the assistance and cooperation of those who were familiar at first hand with the milieu which I wished to reconstruct. Though space forbids detailed acknowledgments, I would like to express here some measure of my gratitude to all who helped me in any capacity to Professor Paul Henry Lang and Dr. Erich Hertzmann, of the Department of Music, Columbia