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Cobbetts Legacy to Labourers William Cobbett

Cobbetts Legacy to Labourers

William Cobbett

Published September 12th 2013
ISBN : 9781230259697
Paperback
30 pages
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 About the Book 

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1834 edition. Excerpt: ... very great injury ofMoreThis historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1834 edition. Excerpt: ... very great injury of the community. Men are forbidden, in this kingdom, to grow tobacco on their lands. This, one would think, ought not to be. The eause is, that the excise duty on tobacco yields a great deal of money- and, if the tobacco were cultivated here, instead of being brought from abroad, it is evident that it would be impossible to collect an excise duty from it- because, being planted in every mans garden, and in every field, or corner of a field, those who use tobacco would provide themselves with it without paying duty- as, indeed, some men do now, in spite of the law. We have seen, in letter IT, that it was Cromwell, and his execrable villains, who first invented the.Ernst. We have seen that it was they who fitst made the people pay taxes on tobacco. The duty has remained from that day to this- and though this statute law relative to this matter is not in accordance with natural justice, but a gross violation of that justice, still it shows that those who govern us give us this signal proof, that they do not regard property in land sufficient to warrant the proprietor in thing what he liMet with it- that they do not regard him as having an absolute proprietorship- that they deem it just and proper that he should hold the land, subject to such restraints, charges, and conditions, as the legislature may at any time choose to impose- and this is to be borne in mind when we come to the important matters which are to be the subject of the ensuing letters. The statute law has frequently interfered, in a very direct and positive manner, with regard to the use which men shall make of their lands. There is no doubt that a tract of land will, in many cases, bring more clear profit to the landlord by being in pasture than by being...